Hives (Urticaria)

Welcome to our Patient Portal page!

We are beginning the process of using an electronic medical record in our practice as required by federal law.  As part of that process, we have established a "Patient Portal" in which patients can enter certain information that will help us, including your medical history.  Prior to your next office visit, we ask that you please access our patient portal by clicking on this link to complete our office forms relating to your medical history.  If we have not previously provided you with your Username and Password, please contact our office through our "Contact Us" page on this website or by calling the office at 518-690-0177.

When in our Patient Portal, you will not be able to edit the information under the tabs labeled Contact Information, Insurance, or Problem List.  We would appreciate it if you do your best to complete the information under the other 6 tabs. 

Eventually, we expect that you will be able to use our Patient Portal to obtain your medical records and test results.  However, we are not at that point yet.  We hope that our electronic medical record will allow for patients to obtain such information by sometime in 2013. 

As always, you can contact our office to answer any questions or concerns.

To Provide Us Information Through Our Patient Portal, Please Click The Link Below:

Patient Portal Link

Hives are characterized as itchy red, raised welts (also known as wheals) on the skin's surface that can spread or join together and form larger areas of raised lesions. They are generally triggered by exposure to an allergen or chemical irritant. They tend to appear suddenly and often disappear equally as suddenly.

Hives are usually an allergic reaction to food, medicine or animals. They can also be triggered by sun exposure, stress, excessive perspiration or other, more serious diseases, such as lupus. Anyone can get hives. They are harmless and non-contagious. Hives may itch, burn or sting. They rarely need medical attention as they tend to disappear on their own. However, in persistent cases, your dermatologist may prescribe antihistamines or oral corticosteroids. The best way to prevent hives is to discontinue exposure to the allergic irritant.

Hives lasting more than six weeks are known as chronic urticaria or, if there is swelling below the surface of the skin, angioedema. There are no known causes of angioedema, but it can affect internal organs and therefore requires medical attention.


Contact Us

(518) 690-0177
2508 Western Avenue Altamont, NY 12009