Keratosis Pilaris

Welcome to our Patient Portal page!

We are beginning the process of using an electronic medical record in our practice as required by federal law.  As part of that process, we have established a "Patient Portal" in which patients can enter certain information that will help us, including your medical history.  Prior to your next office visit, we ask that you please access our patient portal by clicking on this link to complete our office forms relating to your medical history.  If we have not previously provided you with your Username and Password, please contact our office through our "Contact Us" page on this website or by calling the office at 518-690-0177.

When in our Patient Portal, you will not be able to edit the information under the tabs labeled Contact Information, Insurance, or Problem List.  We would appreciate it if you do your best to complete the information under the other 6 tabs. 

Eventually, we expect that you will be able to use our Patient Portal to obtain your medical records and test results.  However, we are not at that point yet.  We hope that our electronic medical record will allow for patients to obtain such information by sometime in 2013. 

As always, you can contact our office to answer any questions or concerns.

To Provide Us Information Through Our Patient Portal, Please Click The Link Below:

Patient Portal Link

Also known as follicular keratosis, this is a hereditary skin disorder that causes goosebump-like lesions on the back of the arms, thighs or buttocks. The patches of bumps tend to get dry and itchy, particularly during the winter months. Keratosis pilaris occurs at any age. Because it is hereditary, there is no method of prevention. In some cases, it goes away on its own over time; in other cases, the condition is chronic. Keratosis pilaris is not harmful, however, it is very difficult to treat.

Keratosis pilaris is caused by a build-up of keratin, a protein in the skin that protects it from infection. Keratin plugs up hair follicles causing the rough, bumpy rash. Treatment options include prescriptions for:

  • Medicated creams or lotions with 12 percent ammonium lactate that softens the affected skin.
  • Moisturizers (urea) that help loosen and remove dead skin cells.
  • Topical corticosteroids for short-term, temporary relief of symptoms.
  • Topical retinoids that increase cell turnover, which reduces the plugging of hair follicles.

To help alleviate symptoms, be sure to keep the affected area moistened at all times and avoid harsh soaps.


Contact Us

(518) 690-0177
2508 Western Avenue Altamont, NY 12009