Scleroderma

Welcome to our Patient Portal page!

We are beginning the process of using an electronic medical record in our practice as required by federal law.  As part of that process, we have established a "Patient Portal" in which patients can enter certain information that will help us, including your medical history.  Prior to your next office visit, we ask that you please access our patient portal by clicking on this link to complete our office forms relating to your medical history.  If we have not previously provided you with your Username and Password, please contact our office through our "Contact Us" page on this website or by calling the office at 518-690-0177.

When in our Patient Portal, you will not be able to edit the information under the tabs labeled Contact Information, Insurance, or Problem List.  We would appreciate it if you do your best to complete the information under the other 6 tabs. 

Eventually, we expect that you will be able to use our Patient Portal to obtain your medical records and test results.  However, we are not at that point yet.  We hope that our electronic medical record will allow for patients to obtain such information by sometime in 2013. 

As always, you can contact our office to answer any questions or concerns.

To Provide Us Information Through Our Patient Portal, Please Click The Link Below:

Patient Portal Link

Roughly 300,000 people in the United States suffer from scleroderma. This chronic connective tissue disease results from an over-production of collagen in the skin and other organs. Scleroderma usually appears in people between the ages of 25 and 55. Women get scleroderma more often than men. The disease worsens slowly over years.

There are two types of scleroderma: localized scleroderma, which involves only the skin, and systemic scleroderma, which involves the skin and other organs, such as the heart, lungs, kidneys, intestine and gallbladder. Typical symptoms of the skin include skin hardening, skin that is abnormally dark or light, skin thickening, shiny hands and forearms, small white lumps beneath the skin's surface, tight facial skin, ulcerations on the fingers or toes and change in color of the fingers and toes from exposure to heat or cold. Other symptoms impact bones, muscles, lungs and the digestive tract.

There is no known cause of scleroderma, nor is there a cure. There are individualized treatments that are designed to help alleviate certain symptoms and decrease the activity of the immune system to further slow down the disease.


Contact Us

(518) 690-0177
2508 Western Avenue Altamont, NY 12009