Moles

Welcome to our Patient Portal page!

We are beginning the process of using an electronic medical record in our practice as required by federal law.  As part of that process, we have established a "Patient Portal" in which patients can enter certain information that will help us, including your medical history.  Prior to your next office visit, we ask that you please access our patient portal by clicking on this link to complete our office forms relating to your medical history.  If we have not previously provided you with your Username and Password, please contact our office through our "Contact Us" page on this website or by calling the office at 518-690-0177.

When in our Patient Portal, you will not be able to edit the information under the tabs labeled Contact Information, Insurance, or Problem List.  We would appreciate it if you do your best to complete the information under the other 6 tabs. 

Eventually, we expect that you will be able to use our Patient Portal to obtain your medical records and test results.  However, we are not at that point yet.  We hope that our electronic medical record will allow for patients to obtain such information by sometime in 2013. 

As always, you can contact our office to answer any questions or concerns.

To Provide Us Information Through Our Patient Portal, Please Click The Link Below:

Patient Portal Link

  moles_landing.jpg
If a mole starts to grow, itch, or bleed, make an appointment to see a dermatologist.

Moles: Overview

Also called nevi

Moles are common. Almost every adult has a few moles. Adults who have light skin often have more moles. They may have 10 to 40 moles on their skin. This is normal.

You should not be overly worried about your moles. But you should know:

  • A type of skin cancer, melanoma, can grow in or near a mole.
  • Caught early and treated, melanoma can be cured.
  • The first sign of melanoma is often a change to a mole — or a new mole on your skin.
  • Checking your skin can help you find melanoma early. A dermatologist can show you how to examine your skin and tell you how often you should check your skin.

Moles in children: What parents should know

Moles on a young child’s skin are generally nothing to worry about. It is normal for new moles to appear during childhood and adolescence. Moles will grow as the child grows. Some moles will darken, and others will lighten. These changes are expected in children and seldom a sign of melanoma — a type of skin cancer that can begin in a mole.

Image property of the American Academy of Dermatology.


© American Academy of Dermatology. All rights reserved. Reproduction or republication strictly prohibited without prior written permission. Use of these materials is subject to the legal notice and terms of use located at https://www.aad.org/about/legal


Contact Us

(518) 690-0177
2508 Western Avenue Altamont, NY 12009