Ringworm

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We are beginning the process of using an electronic medical record in our practice as required by federal law.  As part of that process, we have established a "Patient Portal" in which patients can enter certain information that will help us, including your medical history.  Prior to your next office visit, we ask that you please access our patient portal by clicking on this link to complete our office forms relating to your medical history.  If we have not previously provided you with your Username and Password, please contact our office through our "Contact Us" page on this website or by calling the office at 518-690-0177.

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Ringworm: Overview

  Ringworm_rash.png
Ringworm: A rash with a raised, wavy border is a common sign of ringworm.

What is ringworm?

If you have ringworm, you may think you have worms in your skin or a disease caused by worms. You have neither. Ringworm is actually a skin infection caused by fungus. No worms involved.

The name “ringworm” probably comes from the rash that many people see. On the skin, the rash often has a ring-shaped pattern and a raised, scaly border that snakes its way around the edge like a worm.

Ringworm is common. You’ve already had it if you had:

  • Athlete’s foot
  • Jock itch
  • Scalp ringworm

Ringworm can appear on just about any part of your body. On the palms, soles, scalp, groin, and nails, the rash lacks the ring-shaped pattern. On the soles and groin, ringworm also has a different name.

Part of the body
Name Medical name
Skin
Ringworm Tinea corporis
Feet (soles)
Athlete's foot
Tinea pedis
Hands (palms)
Ringworm Tinea manuum
Groin area
Jock itch
Tinea cruris
 Nails  Ringworm  Tinea unguium or onychomycosis

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

No matter where ringworm appears on the body, treatment is important. Without treatment, the rash tends to grow slowly and cover a larger area. You can also infect other areas of your body.

Treatment can get rid of the ringworm and stop the itch, which can be intense. Because ringworm is contagious, treatment can also prevent you from spreading it to others.

Image used with permission of the American Academy of Dermatology National Library of Dermatologic Teaching Slides.


References
Sobera JO and Elewski BE. “Fungal diseases.” In: Bolognia JL, et al. Dermatology. (second edition). Mosby Elsevier, Spain, 2008:1138-46.
Verma S and Heffernan MP. “Superficial fungal infections.” In: Wolff K, Goldsmith LA, et al. Fitzpatrick’s Dermatology in General Medicine (seventh edition). McGraw Hill Medical, New York, 2008: 1807-16.


© American Academy of Dermatology. All rights reserved. Reproduction or republication strictly prohibited without prior written permission. Use of these materials is subject to the legal notice and terms of use located at https://www.aad.org/about/legal


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(518) 690-0177
2508 Western Avenue Altamont, NY 12009