Dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans (DFSP)

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Dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans (DFSP): Overview

What is dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans?

  Dermatofibrosarcoma_-protuberans_landing.jpg
Dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans: This raised, reddish-brown patch began as a small red lump that grew slowly.

Dermatofibrosarcoma (dur-mah-toe-fy-bro-sar-co-ma) protuberans (pro-to-bur-anz) (DFSP) is a rare skin cancer. It begins in the middle layer of skin, the dermis. DFSP tends to grow slowly. It seldom spreads to other parts of the body.

Because DFSP rarely spreads, this cancer has a high survival rate. Treatment is important, though. Without treatment, DFSP can grow deep into the fat, muscle, and even bone. If this happens, treatment can be difficult.

The first sign of this skin cancer is often a small bump on the skin. It may resemble a deep-seated pimple or rough patch of skin. DFSP can also look like a scar. In children, it may remind you of a birthmark.


Image used with permission of Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology: J Am Acad Dermatol 2005;53:76-83

 


References:
Bichakjian CK, Alam M, Andersen J et al. “Dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans: Clinical practice guidelines in oncology.” National Comprehensive Cancer Network. Version 2.2013.
Buck DW, Kim JY, Alam M, “Multidisciplinary approach to the management of dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2012;67(5):861-6.
Criscione VD, Weinstock MA. “Descriptive epidemiology of dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans in the United States, 1973 to 2002.” J Am Acad Dermatol. 2007;56(6):968-73.
Halpern M, Chen E, Ratner D. “Sarcomas.” In Nouri K. [editor]. Skin Cancer. United States. McGraw Hill Medical; 2008. p. 217-18.
Irarrazaval I, Redondo P. “Three-dimensional histology for dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans: case series and surgical technique.” J Am Acad Dermatol. 2012 Nov;67(5):991-6.
Kurlander DE, Martires KJ, Chen Y et al. “Risk of subsequent primary malignancies after dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans diagnosis: a national study.” J Am Acad Dermatol 2013;68(5):790-6.
Thornton SL, Reid J, Papay FA, et al. “Childhood dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans: Role of preoperative imaging.” J Am Acad Dermatol 2005;53:76-83.


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