Neurodermatitis

Welcome to our Patient Portal page!

We are beginning the process of using an electronic medical record in our practice as required by federal law.  As part of that process, we have established a "Patient Portal" in which patients can enter certain information that will help us, including your medical history.  Prior to your next office visit, we ask that you please access our patient portal by clicking on this link to complete our office forms relating to your medical history.  If we have not previously provided you with your Username and Password, please contact our office through our "Contact Us" page on this website or by calling the office at 518-690-0177.

When in our Patient Portal, you will not be able to edit the information under the tabs labeled Contact Information, Insurance, or Problem List.  We would appreciate it if you do your best to complete the information under the other 6 tabs. 

Eventually, we expect that you will be able to use our Patient Portal to obtain your medical records and test results.  However, we are not at that point yet.  We hope that our electronic medical record will allow for patients to obtain such information by sometime in 2013. 

As always, you can contact our office to answer any questions or concerns.

To Provide Us Information Through Our Patient Portal, Please Click The Link Below:

Patient Portal Link

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Neurodermatitis around the anklebone: Scratching an itchy patch around the ankle caused the neurodermatitis to appear.

Neurodermatitis: Overview

Neurodermatitis is a skin condition that begins with an itch.

The itch can develop anywhere on the surface of the body. Most commonly, though, an itchy patch develops on an arm, leg, or the back of the neck. It also commonly develops in the anal and genital areas. When it appears in the genital area, it often appears on the scrotum or vulva.

The itch can be so intense that a person scratches or rubs the itchy patch frequently. The itch can also come and go. For most people, the area feels itchiest when they are relaxing or sleeping. The itch causes people to scratch or rub the area while sleeping — and it can awaken someone from a sound sleep.

Quite often, the itch begins during an especially stressful time in someone’s life. Even when the stress subsides, the itch usually continues. Scratching or rubbing can change the appearance of that itchy patch.

References
Ambika H, Vinod CS, et. al. “A case of neurodermatitis circumscipta of scalp presenting as patchy alopecia.” Int J Trichology. 2013 Apr;5(2):94-6.
Burgin S. “Nummular eczema and lichen simplex chronicus / prurigo nodularis.” In: Wolff K, Goldsmith LA, et al. Fitzpatrick’s Dermatology in General Medicine (seventh edition). McGraw Hill Medical, New York, 2008:160-2.
Doyen J, Demoulin S, et al. “Vulvar skin disorders throughout lifetime: about some representative dermatoses.” Biomed Res Int. Published online Jan 8, 2014.
Habif TP, Campbell JL, et al. “Lichen simplex chronicus” (card #7). Dermatology DDxDeck. Mosby Elsevier 2006.


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