Can you spot skin cancer?

Welcome to our Patient Portal page!

We are beginning the process of using an electronic medical record in our practice as required by federal law.  As part of that process, we have established a "Patient Portal" in which patients can enter certain information that will help us, including your medical history.  Prior to your next office visit, we ask that you please access our patient portal by clicking on this link to complete our office forms relating to your medical history.  If we have not previously provided you with your Username and Password, please contact our office through our "Contact Us" page on this website or by calling the office at 518-690-0177.

When in our Patient Portal, you will not be able to edit the information under the tabs labeled Contact Information, Insurance, or Problem List.  We would appreciate it if you do your best to complete the information under the other 6 tabs. 

Eventually, we expect that you will be able to use our Patient Portal to obtain your medical records and test results.  However, we are not at that point yet.  We hope that our electronic medical record will allow for patients to obtain such information by sometime in 2013. 

As always, you can contact our office to answer any questions or concerns.

To Provide Us Information Through Our Patient Portal, Please Click The Link Below:

Patient Portal Link

Do you know how to spot skin cancer? In this video, the American Academy of Dermatology used an ultraviolet camera to show people the sun damage hidden underneath their skin. While you can’t see all the sun damage on your skin, it’s important to check the spots you can see – before it’s too late.

Everyone is at risk for skin cancer. How much do you know about skin cancer?


Basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma:

  • These are the most common forms of skin cancer, and are collectively referred to as non-melanoma skin cancers.
  • These arise within the top layer of the skin and can appear on any sun-exposed area of the body, but are most frequently found on the face, ears, bald scalp, and neck.
  • Basal cell carcinoma frequently appears as a pearly bump, whereas squamous cell carcinoma often looks like a rough, red, scaly area, or an ulcerated bump that bleeds.
  • Although non-melanoma skin cancer spreads slowly, if left untreated, it can lead to disfigurement.
  • Researchers estimate that 5.4 million cases of non-melanoma skin cancer, including basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, were diagnosed in 3.3 million people in the United States in 2012.
  • See a board-certified dermatologist if you spot anything changing, itching, or bleeding on your skin.
  • When caught early and treated properly, skin cancer is highly curable.

Melanoma:

  • This is the most deadly form of skin cancer.
  • One American dies from melanoma every hour.
  • Melanoma may suddenly appear without warning, but can also develop from or near an existing mole.
  • It can occur anywhere on the body, but is most common on the upper back, torso, lower legs, head, and neck.
  • Melanoma frequently spreads to lymph nodes and most internal organs, making early detection and treatment essential.
  • See a board-certified dermatologist if you spot anything changing, itching, or bleeding on your skin.
  • New, rapidly growing moles, or moles that itch, bleed, or change color are often early warning signs of melanoma and should be examined by a dermatologist.
  • If detected early and treated properly, melanoma is highly treatable.

To help you spot skin cancer early, when it’s most treatable, the American Academy of Dermatology recommends that everyone learn the ABCDEs of melanoma:

  • A is for Asymmetry: One half of the mole does not match the other half.
  • B is for Border irregularity: The edges are ragged, notched, or blurred.
  • C is for Color that varies from one area to another.
  • D is for Diameter: While melanomas are usually greater than 6mm (the size of a pencil eraser) when diagnosed, they can be smaller.
  • E is for Evolving: A mole or skin lesion that looks different from the rest or is changing in size, shape, or color.

For more information about skin cancer prevention and detection, or to find a free skin cancer screening in your area, visit SPOTme.org.

© American Academy of Dermatology. All rights reserved. Reproduction or republication strictly prohibited without prior written permission. Use of these materials is subject to the legal notice and terms of use located at https://www.aad.org/about/legal


Contact Us

(518) 690-0177
2508 Western Avenue Altamont, NY 12009